Kitchen Conversion Chart – Magnetic

In a single 10.5″ x 15.5″ refrigerator magnet you have access to the following information:

  • Teaspoon/Tablespoon/Cup/Fluid Ounce conversion
  • Fahrenheit/Celsius conversion
  • Baking pan dimensions and volume
  • Ounce/Pound conversion
  • Egg boiling time
  • Freezer shelf lives
  • Guidelines for cooking a steak rare/medium rare/medium/well done
  • Guidelines for roasting beef/lamb/chicken/pork
  • Dry spaghetti measurement
  • An inch ruler
  • Plus conversions for altitude, bread, butter, cheese, chocolate, cocoa, corn, cottage cheese, egg, flour, gallon, gelatin, gram, herbs, lemon, marshmallows, onion, orange, pasta, pint, quart, raisins, rice, sugar, turkey, water, and yeast.

Carefully designed to match nearly any kitchen or refrigerator, we invented this kitchen conversion chart to be durable, washable, useful, and (of course) beautiful.

It will easily and attractively fit on any side-by-side fridge door, yet also look great on over-under fridge doors. The tans, yellows and umbers in the chart help it match practically any modern kitchen cabinet from oak to cherry to mahogany to maple to white, while also showing nicely against stainless steel refrigerators.

This chart packs so much information that great cooks will wonder how they did without it.  Magnetic Chart

Look-a-Like KFC Fried Chicken

Want to try making fried chicken like the Colonel? We don’t have the Official Recipe, but our test kitchen came up with the closest equivalent. Give it a shot!

1 frying chicken, cut into frying pieces
1 1/2 cups flour
1 Pkt. (dry) Good Seasons Italian Dressing (The 11 or so herbs and spices!)
1 Envelope Lipton (or other brand) Tomato Cup of Soup
2 eggs, well beaten
2/3 cup milk
Vegetable oil to cover bottom of your skillet; about 1/2 inch deep.

1. Combine eggs and milk. Set aside.
2. Combine flour with the Italian dressing and soup mix.
3. Dip chicken pieces in milk-egg mixture and roll them in the
flour-seasoning mixture. Repeat procedure.
4. Fry pieces over medium heat for 25 to 30 minutes, turning often.
5. Remove from fire. Drain and serve.

3 Ingredient Pie

What could be easier?

Possibly from the depression (the one in 1929) or maybe even earlier.   A pie with only 3 ingredients?

It is similar to a custard pie, but not as heavy.  I usually put cinnamon and a pinch of nutmeg in mine, though I have made it with coconut, which is delicious!  It really is versatile, you can even make a chocolate version by adding cocoa powder and chocolate chips sprinkled on top.  My husband’s favorite is orange, I just put a few drops of orange extract in the filling and zest some orange peel on top.

Ingredients:

  • 2/3 cup sugar
  • 1/3 cup flour
  • 2 cups real cream
  • Pie shell (homemade or store bought)

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees
  2. Combine sugar and flour in a mixing bowl
  3. Hand whisk in cream a bit at a time
  4. When thoroughly mixed, pour into pie shell
  5. Bake for 40 to 45 minutes until the filling is set

You can serve it hot, but I prefer to chill mine and serve it cold with some nice hot tea.  I hope you enjoy it as much as my family does!

Erin

 
 

Ham and Cheese Sliders………..Yummy!

These Ham and Cheese sliders are simple and crowd pleasing sandwiches. Ham and melted cheese topped with a poppy seed butter sauce.

I know what you are thinking…ham and cheese sliders; does that really require a recipe? The answer is YES it does. These have so much flavor. Sure you have your classic ham and cheese sandwich as the base of the recipe but then you top it with a flavorful poppyseed sauce. The sauce is a combo of Worcestershire sauce, onion, mustard, and butter that makes these anything but ordinary. These can be made ahead for a party and are kid friendly because they are small and familiar.

I hate mustard but couldn’t taste the little bit of mustard in the sauce. I don’t know about you but sometimes I just want to cook something that I know kids will eat without complaining about it.

These are great as an appetizer or make it a meal.

Ingredients
  • 24 white dinner rolls
  • 24 pieces honey ham
  • 24 small slices Swiss cheese
  • ⅓ cup mayonnaise
  • ⅓ cup miracle whip
Poppy seed sauce:
  • 1 Tablespoon poppyseeds
  • 1½ Tablespoons yellow mustard
  • ½ cup butter, melted
  • 1 Tablespoon minced onion
  • ½ teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
Instructions:
  1. In a small bowl, mix together mayonnaise and miracle whip. Spread onto both sides of the center of each roll. Place a slice of ham and a slice of Swiss inside of each roll. Close rolls and place them into a large baking dish or heavy cookie sheet. Place very close together.
  2. In a medium bowl, whisk together all of the poppy seed sauce ingredients. Pour evenly over all of the sandwiches. You do not have to use all of the sauce! Just use enough to cover the tops. Let sit 10 minutes or until butter sets slightly. Cover with foil and bake at 350 degrees for 12-15 minutes or until cheese is melted. Uncover and cook for 2 additional minutes or until tops are slightly brown and crispy. Serve warm. Note: Sandwiches can be assembled ahead of time. I don’t like to do it more than a day ahead because they can get soggy from the mayo mixture.

Erin

 

Bacon-Wrapped Smokies with Brown Sugar and Butter

Salty goodness from the bacon and sweetness from the brown sugar. The best of both worlds.

Ingredients

  • 1 package (16 Oz. Size) Little Smokies Sausages
  • 1 pound Bacon, Strips Cut In Half
  • 1 stick Butter
  • 1 cup Brown Sugar, For Sprinkling

Preparation

Preheat oven to 350 F. Cut the bacon slices in half and wrap each smokie with a half strip of bacon. Place all the wrapped smokies in a single layer in a baking dish, or rimmed sheet pan. Then melt the butter and once the butter is melted, pour it over the smokies. Then take some brown sugar and sprinkle evenly over the smokies. Bake for about an hour or until bacon is nice and crisp

I guarantee if you make these, they will be gone! I made them for a gathering and everyone just kept eating them, and eating them.

Erin

Stuffing In A Bundt Pan

Even if you have already gotten your ingredients for Thanksgiving stuffing, no worries,  you can still make this recipe and bake it in a bundt pan. Any stuffing recipe will work I would just add an additional 3 eggs to your recipe to ensure the stuffing stays moist.

I think this is absolutely gorgeous and will definitely be a show stopper on your dining table!

 

Erin

Or you could just use a recipe binder….

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I understand that every time someone asked for her recipe, she said “over my dead body!”

It’s a bit of a ghoulish post, I know, but it is Halloween!

Erin

Thanksgiving Turkey Fruit Tray

There is always a request for a fruit platter at our Thanksgiving meal.  Here is a unique twist.

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Thanksgiving Cheese Tray Turkey

Salami, Crackers & Cheese

Some mild cheddar and colby jack cheeses, salami, and Flipside Pretzel crackers for the feathers. Two peppercorns for the eyes, half a pistachio shell for the beak, and toothpicks for the legs (basically whatever you can find in the pantry) and a folded fourth of a piece of salami for the waddle, and that’s how you make a cheese tray turkey.  This is an easy make ahead platter that all will be talking about.

Recipe Cards: An Overview

There is no simpler way to track a favorite recipe than the recipe card. A deceptively simple rectangle of paper, the modern recipe card is the ultimate low-tech tool for saving and sharing recipes for current and future generations. Thanks to the internet, there are also now a variety of free options for creating beautiful recipe cards that will do your recipes justice.

There are generally 3 sizes of recipe cards to consider. The 3×5” card is the standard card for most of the last 100 years. (Our own 3×5 recipe cards can be found here.) The old recipe card boxes they fit into were designed for America’s small kitchens. As kitchens expanded, so did the capacity of recipe boxes and binders to allow for the now standard 4×6” recipe card. (Our 4×6 recipe cards are here.) The vast majority of all current recipe cards are this size. In the past decade a few brands have expanded to 5×7” recipe cards. (Ours are here.) You may want to avoid these, however, because while they may fit your own binder they may not fit a friend’s binder you wish to share with.

Most recipe cards are designed with around a dozen horizontal lines going across them. Try to choose cards that also have lines on the back to provide you with more space. A good rule of thumb is to use the left side of the card to create an ingredients list column.  The right side should be used to make a second column that lists ingredients. In this way you simplify the preparation process.

Recipe cards come in all varieties of colors and designs. Traditionally, they have had fairly tacky simple line art, but that doesn’t have to be the case. Many modern recipe card designs have become their own art form, with ornate paintings, drawings and even photographs. Whichever you choose, try to find ones that allow for plenty of space for writing, with a simple interior that won’t make your writing hard to read after years of use. The artistry of the card should be most pronounced around the borders.

Before the numerous online recipe sharing sites sprang up, the recipe card was the traditional method of sharing favorite recipes with friends. These cards are seeing a popular resurgence, as the hand-written instruction carries a warmth and personalization that simply can’t be duplicated with a “submit” button.

If you are like many family cooks, you have a collection of hand-written cards handed down from previous generations. To ensure they survive to see the next generation, look into recipe card protectors. These plastic slips are very inexpensive, and for a few pennies you can save a priceless written heirloom.

Lastly, a quick Google for recipe card templates should yield a variety of printable recipe cards that will be typed in Word or Acrobat, or can be printed out and then written on by hand. But we’ve gone through that hassle for you and have put more than 400 free recipe cards in one place.

 

Eight Reasons to Give Your Mom a New Recipe Binder This Mother’s Day

A new recipe binder will make Mom’s day!

There are few people in our lives more important than our moms. She’s the one who helped you with your homework, hugged you when you fell off your bike (after she had scraped the grit out from the wounds ooohh!). She encouraged you and supported you, even with your craziest plans, and, maybe the most importantly, she’s the one who brought your family together around the dining table every evening to talk over the day’s pleasures and pains. When Mother’s Day comes around it’s sometimes hard to find a gift that really acknowledges her hard work. Here are eight reasons why we think a recipe binder–or a recipe box–make a great Mother’s Day gift.

Recipe Binder Selection

A selection of some of our newest half-page recipe binders.

 

1. Help her organize her recipes. 

Dotted Cottage Rose Recipe Binder Tabs

Tabbed dividers from Dotted Cottage Rose recipe binder

Chances are your mom is still busy when it comes to cooking – even if you’re not relying on her to feed you anymore, there’s still those special family holidays and reunions! Organizing a meal can get overwhelming very easily though, even for her – especially when there’s family over she hasn’t visited with for a while. With a recipe binder she can have all those recipes stored in one place – and all our recipe binders come with tabbed dividers to help categorize them. Page protector sleeves make adding more recipes to the recipe binder a snap! No more rummaging through bookshelves and in cupboards!

 

2. Help her pass on family favorites.

Nothing takes you back like the taste of a cake or pie your mom made regularly when you were growing up – and few things matter to her more than passing on these precious traditions that she worked so hard to cultivate and maintain. It’s more than just a cake – it’s your family’s cultural heritage. As time passes and those family recipes are used less regularly, they’re all too easy to forget – what was it she used to make every Thursday after soccer practice? What was the frosting she always swore by for that chocolate cake? A recipe binder will help her document all these important details for future generations.

 

3. Help her get started on creating a family recipe collection.

Like many of us, your mom may have been meaning to collect all her recipes in a family recipe binder for years but hasn’t gotten around to it yet. She may not do the school runs any more, take you to ballet class or football practice, but hey, she’s a busy lady still! A recipe binder will help her out – you can fill it with recipes you know she loves to make, or you might want to give her a recipe binder with just page protectors and dividers, so she can decide what recipes go in there. From a selfish point of view it’s in your interest don’t forget – it will make it simpler for you to crib those favorite recipes if they are easy to find!

 

4. Show her how much you value those meals she used to make.  

If your mom doesn’t cook so much these days now that you kids have all grown up (well supposedly!) then a recipe binder that you’ve filled with some of the most cherished family favorites she’s made over the years can still be a wonderful gift. What better way to show her how much all her hard work has meant and continues to mean to you? Maybe she’ll be inspired to make those cinnamon rolls you all used to enjoy every Sunday again – but even if not, it’ll still bring back some great memories.

 

5. Help ensure a favorite recipe doesn’t get lost forever.

You remember those things…oh what were they, you know, they were sticky and brown and sort of flattish and…we had them that time when… Well,you get the picture. My own mom used to bake a cake that we all loved and for years after her passing my sister and I would check her old recipe books, bake something that we thought might be ‘the one’ only to find that it wasn’t. Was it just the way she made it, we wondered? Did she even have a recipe or was it in her head? Then, one sunny Sunday in my sister’s garden and we were talking about mom, I saw a coy look on her face. She half whispered, “I’ve found it!”. And there it was in an obscure recipe book, the dull title ‘Sultana Loaf’. Mom had even marked it with a pencil and we hadn’t noticed! So the moral of this story is; if you still want to taste those things that you so loved when you were younger, make sure Mom writes those recipes down and hands them on! Buy her a recipe binder or box for recipe cards, and buy yourself one too so that you can duplicate her recipes.

 

6. Share and pass on your own recipes.

Okay so what about new young moms! Come on Grandma! Share those recipes of yours with your family so that all the little things that you have learned over the years get passed along. The most precious present a young mom or mom-to be can have is the knowledge that she is carrying on, not just the family genes, but those most important hints and methods and nutritional meals that will make her life a little easier when she is worried about what to put in the hungry little mouths around the table. With so many young moms having to work to make ends meet, those old recipes are coming into their own again. You can keep on giving her advice and tips and jot down a recipe for her once in a while, but if you organize it all for her in a beautiful recipe binder, she’ll be able to keep consulting it for years!

 

7. Make it easier for her to save money and eat healthily with good, home-cooked meals.

I remember when I was a girl that eating at a restaurant was a really big deal. It was a time when there was not much spare cash around for treats. We have got more used to going out to eat in the last few decades (or do I mean half century – whoops! where did that time go?!) but of late we are all having to tighten our belts (literally and metaphorically!) and the cheapest way to eat wholesomely is around the kitchen table. Mom, Grandma and Great Grandma knew all about thrift and nutrition. They may not have learned these things in schools or in magazines or on on TV, but if you look at some of those old recipes you’ll see that Mom ( and Mom’s Mom) really did know a thing or two about eating healthily, cheaply and probably most importantly, satisfyingly. A recipe binder will help ensure that those recipes don’t get forgotten even when the lean days are over – and will make the prospect of cooking dinner rather than ordering a pizza a lot less daunting!

 

8. A recipe binder is beautiful – and will remind mom of how special she is longer than flowers will!

Dotted Cottage Rose Recipe Binder

Full-page recipe binder – Dotted Cottage Rose design

A binder that you invest in now will last a long, long time. I have talked to many of our customers in my time with The Cookbook People, who tell me that the old one they have had for the last thirty years (seriously!) is at last falling apart and they are ready to start again with a new binder and maybe add some new recipes to the old ones. Well, maybe help them out with one of the most thoughtful gifts you can give this Mother’s Day. And remember that , yes, we all have computers but those recipe websites have a limited life span and the surest way to keep those precious foodie moments alive in the memory is the hard copy! So, feel free to buy the candy and the flowers, Mom will love them, and you, just as always. But how about that extra little gift that can say ‘I love you, Mom’ and show her that you recognize how truly special she is.

 

Happy Mother’s Day!

A recipe box or binder that’s just for you.

A recipe box just for you can make cooking dinner a joy.

Recipe Box and Binder

Have your own personal recipe box.

You may have given quite a few recipe boxes, recipe binders or recipe card sets away to relatives or friends as gifts this year. But have you thought about how much you might benefit from a simple recipe keeping solution yourself? Now a new year is well underway and it’s time to think about your own kitchen needs – and maybe give yourself a gift for once!

Recipe collections are often passed down through the generations, but not everyone has a Great Aunt Sally who made the world’s best mac and cheese. Some of us were raised by busy single parents who just didn’t have time to cook. Some simply don’t have a family legacy in the kitchen. Many of us may still have the family recipes, but still want their own collection to help them find their style as a cook. It’s great to keep passing down traditions, but all great traditions change and grow with time. After all, it is your family too!

Another reason to start a personal collection is if you or someone close to you has a special diet. After all, grandma’s collection from the 40’s probably doesn’t have too many vegan options, to say nothing of gluten-free possibilities. Sometimes diet restrictions can feel overwhelming and isolating. Starting a collection that fits your needs can empower you to handle your specific needs.

So, consider starting a personal collection of recipes, in a recipe box or binder. If you’re starting out, starting over, or just getting adventurous in the kitchen, a personal collection can be a great way to encourage you to develop your skills. A recipe box is good place to start – recipes written on smaller, easy-to-find cards can make things seem less daunting! Most recipe boxes come with subject dividers to help you keep things organized, and you can buy dividers and protective covers for the recipe cards separately too.

To start, don’t over think the project. Choose a system that lends itself to easy organization, and then start collecting recipes. You can find them online, of course, but don’t stop there. The library often has a large selection of cookbooks, including specialty books that you might not consider buying for yourself. Take them home and try them out, then copy your favorites to cards for your recipe box or binder.

A personal collection can be an empowering aid in the kitchen. It can help you to break out as a cook in your own right – and it keeps cooking fun! Even if you already have the family cookbook, it’s never a bad time to start your own collection to be passed down for generations to come.

Create A Family Cookbook from Your Printed Recipes

It’s easy to create your own family cookbook.

 

In the past, pre-printed cookbooks used to be one of the main sources of recipes.  The other source was passing the recipe from one individual to another on a 3” x 5” index card.  What’s more, people had time to hand-write their recipes out in notebooks, creating a family cookbook to sit on the shelf along with their favorite recipe books.

Organize Printed Recipes into Family Cookbook

Pages of recipes printed from the internet get disorganized – make them into a family cookbook you can feel proud of

Nowadays, things are not so simple, or organized!  With less time to spare and more information available, many of us still haven’t gotten around to writing out those old family recipes – but have started turning to the internet to find ideas. That’s no bad thing – the web has many excellent recipe sites bringing an a vast range of recipes right to our fingertips.  But of course, computers, tablets and smart phones aren’t too good around food or liquid – besides the risk of spillage, it’s not easy to scroll through the instructions (especially with a touch-screen device) when your hands are covered in flour!  So, when it comes to putting these recipes to the test in the kitchen, printing off the recipe is still the best option.  The result is we have a wealth of fantastic new recipes and ideas, but many of them end up scattered around the kitchen printed on loose pieces of paper with no way to organize them.  Meanwhile the family cookbook, once shared through the generations, seems to be falling by the wayside – ironically at a time when preserving, sharing and passing on recipes has never been easier.

 

Maybe you’re someone who wants to rekindle the family cookbook tradition, or perhaps you simply want a tidier kitchen.  Either way, with all these great recipes – whether it’s something your mom wrote out for you or from your internet research – you have a wonderful opportunity to create and maintain an organized collection of recipes that you can feel truly proud of.  Instead of being overwhelmed by the all the print-outs you’ve kept, the scraps you’ve been given, and the bookmarks to more great recipes you’ve saved on your computer – you can collect all these favorite finds and bind them together to make your own, new, family cookbook.

 

Making a family cookbook that is customized to your family may be simpler than you think.  First of all, place each of these printed recipes into a page protector.  This allows you to wipe off the page if any food or crumbs should get on it during food preparation.

 

Pick out a recipe binder in your preferred color or design.  This can be your favorite color, or it can be coordinated with your kitchen.  You may choose a simple, plain binder which will allow your family to decorate and customize the outside of it with craft paint or markers.  Many ring binders allow for a paper insert for the front, back and the spine, so you and your family might want to try drawing a design together.  Alternatively you might prefer to select a more ornate binder that your family all will love.

 

The next question you may ask is how to organize the inside of the book.  There are different ways to do this.  Some may want to organize by type of dish such as appetizer, casserole, soup, stew, cakes, or cookies.  Others may want to organize the book by what is contained in the dish such as having a section for beef, chicken, or pork.  Using basic tab dividers which are made for binders, organize the cookbook in a way that will be easiest for your family.  Some more expensive binders include pre-printed tabs.

 

Putting together a family cookbook is an activity in which the entire family can become involved.  If you have children, they will enjoy decorating the outside of the binder and the dividers for the different sections.  They also may enjoy helping to place the recipes inside the plastic page protectors.  In the end, you will have a product that your family will use and will remember the joy of making.

 

For more information and ideas, please visit us!

Tidy Caramel Apples

Makes 24 slices
Prep time: 30 minutes
Cool time: 20 minutes

Ingredients
• 3 large Granny Smith apples (or any apple of your choice)
• 1 large lemon
• 2 cups caramel squares, unwrapped
• 2 tablespoons corn syrup
• 1/4 cup chopped pecans
• Chocolate sauce (optional)

Directions
Cut your apples in half and use a melon baller to scoop out the insides, leaving the walls intact at about 1/2 to 1/4 inch thickness.

Squeeze the juice from the lemon onto the apples and allow to set. (This will keep them from turning brown right away.)

To make the caramel sauce, melt the caramel squares in a sauce pan over low heat, with the corn syrup. Allow to cool for about 10-15 minutes.

Using a paper towel, wipe your apples down, removing the lemon juice as much as possible. If the inside of your apple is too wet, the caramel wont stick.

Pour the caramel into the hollowed out apples until just below the top. Sprinkle with pecans.

Chill in the refrigerator until the caramel has set, about 20 minutes. Cut into slices and drizzle with chocolate sauce, if desired.

 

Check for Fresh Eggs

How to Check for Fresh Eggs

#1. This is just what my Mum once told me. If you do this test and get sick and die, well, please don’t sue the Cookbook People. We sell delightful recipe binders and recipe boxes and write cookbook software. We aren’t organic biologists.

#2. That said, if you use this test, cook the good eggs immediately. Bacteria can get in through the water through the shell once you submerge them.

#3. Fresh eggs are harder to peel after boiling than older eggs.

#4. Always spin your eggs a little in the grocery store. If one sticks to the carton, you’ve got a bad egg. Nobody likes a bad egg.

#5. Please buy Free Range Eggs. They taste better, they only cost a little more, and the lovely birds shouldn’t spend their whole lives in little boxes. #6. Place this useful tidbit inside your recipe binder! 🙂

Great Healthy Eating Diagram to Add to Your Recipe Binder

healthy eating plate diagram

This healthy eating diagram published by Harvard is such a major improvement over the USDA’s version, mostly because the USDA has the conflicting jobs of promoting health while also promoting the American refined grain and corn syrup industries.

I plan on including this in an upcoming free recipe binder printable (click that link to see others already available). I love a nice cherry pie, but I think when cooking you also need to keep nutrition at the forefront!

Wedding Custom Recipe Binder Gift

Wedding Recipe Binder gift

First off, yes, that is my own wedding photo. 🙂 Happy, happy day.
Now then, if you’re reading this, you like recipes and you like to organize them. And maybe, just maybe, you are lucky enough to be attending a June wedding this year. Why not give the gift of a nice customizable recipe binder or personalized recipe box that lets the happy couple add a photo to the front? The merging of two families represented by the joyous co-mingling of two recipe collections! Glorious! (The groom’s collection may only consist of  Del Monte Sloppy Joe mix and the phone number to Domino’s, but never mind. I’m trying to be romantic here!)

*Bonus* Well, nobody asked for it, but here’s my wedding party. I love this photo.

Cold soup for you!

The New York Times has a fantastic collection of cold soup recipes on their site. The secret to cold soup is that it has to be ICE COLD, not luke warm. Not even kind of cold. It must rattle your teeth with its icy goodness!

I took the above screenshot of the page because I just loved the layout. Follow the link to learn all the recipes, but here’s my favorite:

Vichyssoise
Ingredients

Butter

Potatoes

Leeks

Stock

Cream

Chives

Melt 2 tablespoons butter in a large pot. Add 3 peeled and cubed potatoes and 3 trimmed and chopped leeks. Cook for about 3 minutes, stirring, until softened. Add 4 cups stock. Boil, cover, lower the heat and simmer until vegetables are tender, about 20 minutes. Purée, then let cool. Stir in 1/2 cup or more cream before serving. Garnish: Chopped chives.

(And yes, the title of this post is a slight allusion to one of my favorite Seinfeld episodes.)

Sneaky binders

I think instead of alcohol I’d stash some raspberry chocolate cake. Just so the boys don’t eat it all…. 🙂

Erin

Recipe Binder Freebie: Kitchen Conversion Chart

Want to know how long to boil an egg to produce a creamy yolk? How long to cook a steak to make it medium rare? How many tablespoons are in a half cup? We put it all together in a simple-to-use and quite pretty conversion chart click here. It will fit in many of our beautiful recipe binders.

I posted about this a few years ago, but it seemed like a nice time to refresh it for our much larger audience.

We also sell the same information on pre-printed cards. Click here to go to the half page conversion chart:

Closeup:

….and here’s the full page conversion chart:

Why buy them when you can download the same info for free? Well, they already have the holes to fit in your binder, they are on a heavy durable card paper stock, and they are only $0.99. So why not?

Lastly, if you’d like the same information easily visible on your refrigerator, might I introduce you to our handy one-of-a-kind refrigerator magnet chart:


Here’s a little Youtube video we made of our binder charts, in case you are interested: